Carbon dating lesson plans

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Inscriptions, distinctive markings, and historical documents can all offer clues to an artifact's age.

And if the artifact is organic—like wood or bone—researchers can turn to a method called radiocarbon dating.

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A great evolution experiment is for students to make observations of bone structures of different animals.

American physical chemist Willard Libby led a team of scientists in the post World War II era to develop a method that measures radiocarbon activity.

He is credited to be the first scientist to suggest that the unstable carbon isotope called radiocarbon or carbon 14 might exist in living matter. Libby and his team of scientists were able to publish a paper summarizing the first detection of radiocarbon in an organic sample. Libby who first measured radiocarbon’s rate of decay and established 5568 years ± 30 years as the half-life. Libby was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in recognition of his efforts to develop radiocarbon dating.

Archaeology and other human sciences use radiocarbon dating to prove or disprove theories.

Over the years, carbon 14 dating has also found applications in geology, hydrology, geophysics, atmospheric science, oceanography, paleoclimatology, and even biomedicine.

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